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Demonstration Site Before & after photos

Drainage

Before

Pooling water around roundpen.

 
After

Shallow grass-lined ditch moves water around the roundpen.
   
Before

Water moved through the roundpen creating an erosion channel and pooling in low spots.
After

As shown in previous picture, water was diverted around the roundpen. Additionally, the area inside the roundpen was regraded, geotextile was installed and new footing placed on top.
   
Before

Water moved through the roundpen, through the walkway between the pen and the paddocks, picking up manure and sediments
After

With the paddock improvements shown above, water was diverted away from this area. Additionally the walkway and paddocks were also regraded and compacted so that manure pickup was possible during wet weather.
   
Before

Water moved through the walkway and down the back pasture, creating an erosion channel where sediments and manure were carried to the creek.
After

The pasture was regraded to create sheetflow across the entire pasture and eliminate the erosion channel formation. Additionally, the entire slope was reseeded with pasture grass to stabilize the soil and allow for seasonal grazing. (Reverse view)
     
The following series of pictures are all from one property that was dealing with a tremendous amount of MUD!


Before

Upper slope that lead to the barn entrance

 
After

This area is now completely off-line to the horses during the wet weather and only occasionally grazed to manage growth in the dry months. This slope has been seeded to stabilize it and minimize erosion.
     
Before

Alternative view of slope leading down to the barn. The horses had to use this pathway to make their way to the barn each evening for feeding.
 
After

Additional view of slope now off-line.
     
Before

Top tier of the slope to the barn looking up the slope.
 
Before

Entrance to the barn looking up the slope. (This picture was taken just below the picture to the left.)
     
Before

Bottom of the slope as you enter the barn.
 
Before

View from inside entrance to the barn.
     
After

The new entrance into the barn is more gradual with a path that is defined by wood chips to minimize erosion and mud.

   
Once the horses were down the slope and into the barn or the paddocks the challenges were not over.
Before

Water collected at the bottom of the slope, which was the entrance to the barn and the paddocks.
 
Before

The rainwater flowed down the slope and collected inside the barn stalls.
     
After
The property was regraded the retaining wall was extended, a French drain and gutters were installed, the paddocks were covered and the entire slope was reseeded.
By extending the existing retaining wall the barn was able to be enlarged, so that all of the paddocks are now covered. A French drain was installed behind the wall to capture subsurface runoff and divert it to a sediment basin
     
After

The gutters outlet into the drain installed behind the retaining wall. The surface inlets to the drain also allow surface water moving off the slope to enter and be diverted to the sediment basin
After

This is a sediment basin. The diverted drainage enters the basin from the horizontal black pipe. Once the sediments settle out, the clean water empties into the vertical black pipe.
Before
Before
As the water pooled at the slope’s bottom the paddocks became so muddy you could not pick up the manure that was accumulating. As the manure was mixed into the mud by the horses walking on it, more mud was created. The deeper the mud got, the less mucking could be done, thus even more mud.
Reverse view of the paddocks.
After

New covered paddock area.
After

View from the slope of new covered paddock area.
Before
After
Mud filled paddocks
The paddocks were graded, compacted and new footing was lain.
Manure Bunkers


Before
Before
Before the manure was stored in wire “baskets” which were cumbersome and difficult to manage – OR …
 
Additional manure was stored in a large pile, until it could be used or hauled away.
     
After

Now the manure is stored in covered bins that are easy to access, and are visually appealing too!
     
Before

The manure was stored in a pile on the bare ground until it could be used or hauled away.
     
After

Now the manure is stored on a cement slab, under a permanent cover with sides to contain it.
     
   
Before

These bins were designed to be temporary and were starting to deteriorate. Tarps were used for covering the manure and there was only a partial cement slab underneath.
This next property operates a forced air system to produce compost from their 20+ horse boarding facility. The forced air system allows compost to be created more quickly with less physical labor.
After

The entire bin system was covered with a permanent roof and was set on a cement slab.
Before

This is the inside view of one of the bins of the deteriorating bunker system.
After

This is the inside view of one bin in the new system. The slatted floor allows the air to be blow into the pile and is set on top of the concrete slab.
     
Before

The original bins did not have a drainage system built into the design.
 
After

The new system has drains built into the cement slab to capture any leachate, which is then plumbed to their septic system.
     
Before

Manure was stored on a slab, uncovered and unconfined.
 
After

Now the manure confined in a bunker with a permanent roof. This new bunker will contain the manure and keep excess water from mixing with it thus minimizing the possibility of pathogens and excess nutrients from washing into nearby Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.
     
Before

The manure was stored on the ground with bins that were starting to deteriorate. The bins were also too big to be able to turn the manure easily.
     
After

The new bunker system is built out of more sturdy materials. The sides and base are cement. Each bin is also smaller so that turning can be done more easily.
     

Wooden slats help to keep the manure contained.  When not being attended to, the bins are covered with a tarp to keep our excess rainwater.
     
Additional Bunker Designs